Rapid modulation of sensory processing induced by stimulus conflict.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2011-09

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

167
views
143
downloads

Citation Stats

Abstract

Humans are constantly confronted with environmental stimuli that conflict with task goals and can interfere with successful behavior. Prevailing theories propose the existence of cognitive control mechanisms that can suppress the processing of conflicting input and enhance that of the relevant input. However, the temporal cascade of brain processes invoked in response to conflicting stimuli remains poorly understood. By examining evoked electrical brain responses in a novel, hemifield-specific, visual-flanker task, we demonstrate that task-irrelevant conflicting stimulus input is quickly detected in higher level executive regions while simultaneously inducing rapid, recurrent modulation of sensory processing in the visual cortex. Importantly, however, both of these effects are larger for individuals with greater incongruency-related RT slowing. The combination of neural activation patterns and behavioral interference effects suggest that this initial sensory modulation induced by conflicting stimulus inputs reflects performance-degrading attentional distraction because of their incompatibility rather than any rapid task-enhancing cognitive control mechanisms. The present findings thus provide neural evidence for a model in which attentional distraction is the key initial trigger for the temporal cascade of processes by which the human brain responds to conflicting stimulus input in the environment.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1162/jocn.2010.21575

Publication Info

Appelbaum, LG, DV Smith, CN Boehler, WD Chen and MG Woldorff (2011). Rapid modulation of sensory processing induced by stimulus conflict. J Cogn Neurosci, 23(9). pp. 2620–2628. 10.1162/jocn.2010.21575 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/13538.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Appelbaum

Lawrence Gregory Appelbaum

Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Greg Appelbaum is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the Duke University School of Medicine. 

Dr. Appelbaum's research interests primarily concern the brain mechanisms underlying visual cognition, how these capabilities differ among individuals, and how they can be improved through behavioral, neurofeedback, and neuromodulation interventions. Within the field of cognitive neuroscience, his research has addressed visual perception, sensorimotor function, executive function, decision-making, and learning/expertise. In this research, he has utilized a combination of behavioral psychophysics coupled with the neuroscience techniques of electroencephalography (EEG), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). 

Woldorff

Marty G. Woldorff

Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Dr. Woldorff's main research interest is in the cognitive neuroscience of attention. At each and every moment of our lives, we are bombarded by a welter of sensory information coming at us from a myriad of directions and through our various sensory modalities -- much more than we can fully process. We must continuously select and extract the most important information from this welter of sensory inputs. How the human brain accomplishes this is one of the core challenges of modern cognitive neuroscience. Dr. Woldorff uses a combination of electrophysiological (ERP, MEG) and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) methods to study the time course, functional neuroanatomy, and mechanisms of attentional processes. This multimethodological approach is directed along several main lines of research: (1) The influence of attention on sensory and perceptual processing; (2) Cognitive and attentional control mechanisms; (3) The role of attention in multisensory environments; (4) The interactive relationship between attention and reward; and (5) The role of attention in perceptual awareness.


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.