Gene expression disruptions of organism versus organ in Drosophila species hybrids.

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2008-08-20

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Abstract

Hybrid dysfunctions, such as sterility, may result in part from disruptions in the regulation of gene expression. Studies of hybrids within the Drosophila simulans clade have reported genes expressed above or below the expression observed in their parent species, and such misexpression is associated with male sterility in multigenerational backcross hybrids. However, these studies often examined whole bodies rather than testes or had limited replication using less-sensitive but global techniques. Here, we use a new RNA isolation technique to re-examine hybrid gene expression disruptions in both testes and whole bodies from single Drosophila males by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We find two early-spermatogenesis transcripts are underexpressed in hybrid whole-bodies but not in assays of testes alone, while two late-spermatogenesis transcripts seem to be underexpressed in both whole-bodies and testes alone. Although the number of transcripts surveyed is limited, these results provide some support for a previous hypothesis that the spermatogenesis pathway in these sterile hybrids may be disrupted sometime after the expression of the early meiotic arrest genes.

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10.1371/journal.pone.0003009

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Catron, Daniel J, and Mohamed AF Noor (2008). Gene expression disruptions of organism versus organ in Drosophila species hybrids. PLoS One, 3(8). p. e3009. 10.1371/journal.pone.0003009 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/4502.

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Noor

Mohamed A. F. Noor

Professor of Biology

Research in my laboratory strives to understand what genetic changes contribute to the formation of new species, what maintains fitness-related variation in natural populations, and how the process of genetic recombination affects both species formation and molecular evolution. Our approaches combine classical genetic, molecular genetic, and genomic/ bioinformatic analyses, along with occasional forays into areas like animal behavior (in relation to speciation). I am also very interested in helping develop educational activities (K-12 or college) in genetics and evolution.  See my lab webpage for more detailed information: https://sites.google.com/view/noor-lab 


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