Criminal Injustice: Race, Representative Bureaucracy, and New York City’s Criminal Justice System

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Date

2017

Authors

Ashe, Austin W.

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Abstract

Recently, research concerning the United States Criminal Justice System has been dominated by discussions of mass incarceration and deadly acts of police violence. Although there is conflicting evidence regarding the impact of racial diversity in criminal justice organizations, it continues to receive consideration as a prescription for racial disparities in policing, sentencing, and incarceration. Few studies have provided a holistic analysis of multiple components of the criminal justice system in one locality. This research focuses on the role of race throughout New York City’s Criminal Justice System. Based on court observations, ethnographic data, and semi-structured interviews I focus on the experiences and perspectives of black and Latino actors involved in the criminal justice process. Findings suggest that race itself is not predictive of active representation, while the link between passive and active representation cannot be completely dismissed. I discuss the implications of these findings for future research and policy initiatives aimed at reducing racial disparities in policing and incarceration.

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Embargo extended at request of author with approval by advisor and Graduate School administration.--mjf33 20190305

Citation

Citation

Ashe, Austin W. (2017). Criminal Injustice: Race, Representative Bureaucracy, and New York City’s Criminal Justice System. Dissertation, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/14547.

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