Correction for Eddy Current-Induced Echo-Shifting Effect in Partial-Fourier Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

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2015

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Abstract

In most diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies, images are acquired with either a partial-Fourier or a parallel partial-Fourier echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence, in order to shorten the echo time and increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, eddy currents induced by the diffusion-sensitizing gradients can often lead to a shift of the echo in k-space, resulting in three distinct types of artifacts in partial-Fourier DTI. Here, we present an improved DTI acquisition and reconstruction scheme, capable of generating high-quality and high-SNR DTI data without eddy current-induced artifacts. This new scheme consists of three components, respectively, addressing the three distinct types of artifacts. First, a k-space energy-anchored DTI sequence is designed to recover eddy current-induced signal loss (i.e., Type 1 artifact). Second, a multischeme partial-Fourier reconstruction is used to eliminate artificial signal elevation (i.e., Type 2 artifact) associated with the conventional partial-Fourier reconstruction. Third, a signal intensity correction is applied to remove artificial signal modulations due to eddy current-induced erroneous T2(∗) -weighting (i.e., Type 3 artifact). These systematic improvements will greatly increase the consistency and accuracy of DTI measurements, expanding the utility of DTI in translational applications where quantitative robustness is much needed.

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10.1155/2015/185026

Publication Info

Truong, Trong-Kha, Allen W Song and Nan-Kuei Chen (2015). Correction for Eddy Current-Induced Echo-Shifting Effect in Partial-Fourier Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Biomed Res Int, 2015. p. 185026. 10.1155/2015/185026 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/11994.

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Scholars@Duke

Truong

Trong-Kha Truong

Associate Professor in Radiology

I co-lead the MR Engineering Lab, which is part of the Brain Imaging and Analysis Center at Duke University.

Our research involves the development of novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil technologies – in particular integrated parallel reception, excitation, and shimming (iPRES) and integrated radio-frequency/wireless (iRFW) coils – to enable imaging, localized B0 shimming, and/or wireless communication with a single coil, thereby improving the image quality and clinical utility of MRI applications such as functional MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging in the human brain and body.

We also develop high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging techniques to investigate the microstructure of the human brain and to detect abnormalities in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Song

Allen W Song

Professor in Radiology

The research in our lab is concerned with advancing structural and functional MRI methodologies (e.g. fast and high-resolution imaging techniques) for human brain imaging. We also aim to improve our understanding of functional brain signals, including spatiotemporal characterizations of the blood oxygenation level dependent contrast and alternative contrast mechanisms that are more directly linked to the neuronal activities. Additional effort is invested in applying and validating the developed methods to study human functional neuroanatomy.


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