Assessment and User Experience

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  • ItemOpen Access
    Research Data Repository usability test - December 2023
    (2023-12-19) Saxena, Yasha; Dong, Shelley
    This study investigated user experience of the Research Data Repository (RDR), an online digital repository intended for researchers to both download published datasets and upload datasets from their own publications. Therefore, the study was split into two sub-studies, one for the upload interface and one for the download interface. The upload interface study investigated how well the submission interface supports a participant’s ability to successfully fill out metadata related to a publication dataset. The download interface study investigated how well the search interface supports a participant’s ability to search for datasets and comprehend specific content within a dataset’s homepage.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Transparency Tool usability test - July 2023
    (2023-07-11) McKinnell, Jimmy; Dwyer, Sarah
    The DUL Racial Equity Roadmap was developed in 2020 and has been used to guide strategic actions around racial equity over the last few years. The Report Recommendations Transparency Tool (or R2T2) was developed by the Racial Justice Strategy Task Force to keep track of specific recommendations related to DEI initiatives in the Libraries. The latest version of this tool was a spreadsheet that summarized these recommendations and any progress updates, but the format of the file didn’t seem like a good fit for staff who have to update the contents or who want to learn more about these initiatives. Transparency is the result of converting R2T2 into an interactive website. This study was conducted during Transparency’s active development phase, with the goal of collecting usability data prior to a staff-wide public launch. This usability study was performed by Sarah Dwyer and Jimmy McKinnell, two Assessment and User Experience summer practicum students from UNC’s School of Information and Library Science. These sessions occurred via individual Zoom sessions across two days, July 6 and July 11, 2023.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Duke Digital Repository usability test, part 2 - May 2023
    (2023-05-10) Siqi-Liu, Audrey
    This is part two out of two usability tests of the Duke Digital Repositories (DDR). Both parts were designed to answer stakeholder questions about the usability of specific DDR functions. All test sessions were conducted remotely via Zoom by Audrey Siqi-Liu. Part one included basic tasks like downloading digital materials and requesting access to metadata only items. Part two included more advanced tasks: navigating finding aids and collection records, and using the relations feature. Participants were recruited from users of the DDR who had logged in for the first time over the past six months and were prescreened for either experience with browsing digital collections or using any reading room.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Duke Digital Repository usability test, part 1 - April 2023
    (2023-04-27) Siqi-Liu, Audrey
    This is part one out of two usability tests of the Duke Digital Repositories (DDR). Both parts were designed to answer stakeholder questions about the usability of specific DDR functions. All test sessions were conducted remotely via Zoom by Audrey Siqi-Liu. Part one included basic tasks like downloading and requesting access. Participants were recruited from a list of students who volunteered to be contacted about library user studies and were not prescreened for previous DDR experience.
  • ItemUnknown
    Attending Scholarly Events During the Pandemic
    (2023-06-20) Boers, Greta; Chapman, Joyce
    When WHO identified Covid-19 as a pandemic in 2020, the resulting international lockdowns required immediate changes to all aspects of the scholarly enterprise, as in-person formats transferred to online modalities. The objective of this survey was to understand the impact of the pandemic on preferences about attending scholarly events, including conferences, workshops, and seminars. It was distributed to international communities in classical studies, ancient studies, archaeology, medieval studies, public history, and related fields. Since the sample was entirely voluntary, the results are only suggestive. The attendance factor which changed most dramatically from pre- and post- pandemic was personal interest, from 38.3% of respondents to 54.01%. Accessibility accommodations and assistive technologies nearly tripled in importance after the pandemic started (from 2.4% to 6.7%). The degree to which geographic location, affordability and institutional support influenced attendance decreased drastically. Social networking was consistently the least important factor in pre- and post-pandemic attendance (10.8% to 6.7%) but generated the highest number of free text comments(48.8%). More respondents (43.2%) weighed the trade-offs between in-person and online events, followed by those who liked online events (37.6%). Relatively few disliked them (18.0%). The respondent’s comment quoted above summarizes the value of the survey results as material for reflection. Relevance to research and teaching, personal interest, inclusion, accessibility, and affordability are considerations which cut across disciplines, academic status and employment. The survey results suggest that online and hybrid events lift some of the barriers to scholarly communication and communities.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Understanding the experiences and needs of international students at Duke
    (2023-06-15) Chapman, Joyce; Hayes, Matthew; Park, Sarah; Wang, Candice
    How can Duke University Libraries further support the needs of its international students? To explore this question, a cross-departmental team of library staff conducted discussion groups with international graduate and undergraduate students during the 2022-2023 academic year and analyzed international students’ responses to the Libraries’ 2023 student satisfaction survey. We sought to understand international students’ experiences in the Libraries and on Duke’s campus in order to improve how well library services, staff, facilities, and materials meet their needs. We spoke with students about their experiences outside the Libraries so that we could understand their experiences holistically, and the greater context in which the Libraries function for them. Findings identify challenges students experience and suggest specific points for library intervention and support. While this report focuses on the experiences and needs of international students, it should be emphasized that some challenges experienced by international student are challenges experiences by all students. In many cases, support or expansions of campus and library services targeted toward international students will help all students succeed.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Duke University Libraries: Web Analytics Pilot
    (2023-04-21) Conway, Patrick; Dalsheimer, Sam; Foley, Chance; Leonhardt, Wesley; Wegner, Delia
    Our team worked with the Assessment and User Experience Strategy (AUXS) team of Duke University Libraries (DUL) to run a pilot test of Matomo, an open-source alternative to Google Analytics. The purpose was to evaluate the feasibility of decoupling from the Google ecosystem to better meet their commitments to user privacy. Through a collaborative and agile process, we implemented Matomo on DUL servers, tested technical processes on high- and low-traffic sites, engaged stakeholders, and provided a series of recommendations on how to best transition all 110 DUL websites to Matomo. This work was completed for a UNC-Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science Master's Practicum Project, 2023. Site sponsor: Sean Aery (Duke University Libraries). The poster was presented at the 2023 UNC SILS Scholar Showcase (April 21, 2023, Carolina Union) and at the DUL First Wednesday Presentation Series (May 3, 2023, virtual).
  • ItemOpen Access
    Interlibrary Loan usability test - March 2023
    (2023-03-23) Rowland, Gary
    Gary Rowland, a UNCG MLIS capstone intern with the Duke Libraries’ Assessment & User Experience Strategy Department, conducted a usability study to test students’ feedback regarding Duke’s Interlibrary Requests page and ILLiad webpages, as well as their perceptions of Duke’s interlibrary loan webpages compared to NC State’s Tripsaver page. The study gathered impressions of these pages and asked participants to perform two tasks: requesting a book and an article from Duke’s interlibrary loan. The test included four pre-test questions and lasted approximately 15-20 minutes. The study was developed by Gary Rowland with guidance from Dr. Angela Zoss and Thomas Crichlow.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Support Request Form Assessment - November 2022
    (2022-11-22) Crichlow, Thomas
    This report summarizes findings from a focus group session with 16 IT staff who receive IT support requests submitted through the DST Support Request form and findings from an anonymous online survey shared with approximately 250 library staff who submit IT support requests through the DST Support Request form. Specific recommendations are provided and key insights are documented. Complete responses are provided in the appendices.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Top Textbooks usability test - November 2022
    (2022-11) Yu, Qian (Tracey)
    Qian (Tracey) Yu, practicum student in the Assessment & User Experience Strategy Department, conducted a remote usability test on the DUL Top Textbooks interface on the Duke University Libraries website. Test sessions included two undergraduate students, one graduate student, and two staff members.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Staff Directory remote usability test - October 2021
    (2021) Wilson, Carrie; Dunefsky, Chadwick
    This study aimed to gather feedback from undergraduate and graduate students regarding the redesigned Duke University Libraries staff directory’s search functions. The testing script was developed by Chadwick Dunefsky and Carrie Wilson with guidance from Candice Wang, Emily Daly, and Thomas Crichlow. An ad was placed in the undergraduate and graduate email newsletters to gather potential participants via a Qualtrics poll. Then, seven students with varying experience with searching for library staff information and varying years at Duke were selected from those who responded to the poll. Candice Wang, the graduate research assistant to the AUX department, was asked to be the pilot study participant. All eight sessions were conducted remotely between October 6th and October 18th, 2021.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Priorities and Guiding Principles for Protecting Patron Privacy
    (2021-08-17) Zoss, Angela; Gatlin, Shadae; Girardeau, Arnetta; Guthrie, Brooke; Healy, Ciara; Hill, Jack; Wickes, Abigail; McGeary, Tim
    The Duke University Libraries’ Data Privacy and Retention Task Force was charged in the Spring 2020 in response to a Data Privacy and Retention Audit conducted by the Assessment & User Experience Department. This task force was charged to develop a document clarifying DUL's priorities and guiding principles related to privacy.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Library Takeout remote usability test - January 2021
    (2021-01) Wang, Candice
    This study was conducted to test the Library Takeout Service at Duke University Libraries (DUL) launched in summer 2020. Anh Nguyen and Emily Daly developed the study with input from Kelli Stephenson, Andrea Loigman, and Candice Wang. The test sessions were conducted by Candice Wang. All tests were conducted via Zoom between December 10th and December 17th, 2020. Eight users participated in the study, including six participants who are frequent users of the system and two participants who have never used the system.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Public Report on Inclusive Library Study Space Design - May 2021
    (2021-05-21T15:51:49Z) Zoss, Angela; Brown, Meg; King, Ira; McCurdy, Seth
    This report summarizes findings of a literature review focused on inclusive library space design. The report offers suggestions for different aspects of library space design, including furniture, noise, aesthetics, food and drink, signage, and related websites.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Accessing online journals usability test - April 2021
    (2021-04) Roberts, Cam; Perry, Donte'
    Cam Roberts and Donte’ Perry, practicum students in the Assessment & User Experience Department, conducted a remote usability test on accessing online journals through the Duke University Libraries website. Test sessions included five undergraduate and three graduate students.
  • ItemOpen Access
    SEATS remote usability test - October 2020
    (2020) Nguyen, Anh; Wang, Candice
    This study was conducted to test the seats and equipment reservation system at Duke University Libraries (DUL) launched in fall 2020. Anh Nguyen and Candice Wang wrote the study questions based on discussion questions developed by Angela Zoss and Emily Daly. The test sessions were conducted by Anh Nguyen and Candice Wang. All tests were conducted via Zoom between October 20th and October 29th, 2020. We recruited three participants who are frequent users of the system, three participants who have used the system once, and three participants who have never used the system.
  • ItemOpen Access
    ArcLight remote usability test - September 2020
    (2020) Wang, Candice; Nguyen, Anh; Chapman, Joyce
    This study was conducted to test the usability of David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library's new ArcLight collection guides interface. The study questions were developed by Joyce Chapman and Noah Huffman. The test sessions were conducted by Joyce Chapman, Candice Wang, and Anh Nguyen, with the guidance of Emily Daly. All tests were conducted via Zoom between September 4th and September 15th, 2020.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Understanding the experiences and needs of Black students at Duke
    (2020-04) Chapman, Joyce; Daly, Emily; Forte, Anastasia; King, Ira; Yang, Brenda W.; Zabala, Pamela
    Duke University Libraries (DUL) conducted discussion groups and Photovoice research with Black undergraduate and graduate students at Duke University in 2019. Assessment & User Experience (AUX) staff also analyzed the 2,800 student responses to the Libraries’ 2020 student satisfaction survey in light of what we learned from the fall discussion groups. We sought to understand students’ experiences in the Libraries and on campus to improve how all students interact with library services, facilities, and materials. We did not limit our discussions to library services and spaces, as it was important to explore Black students’ experience and use of the Libraries holistically.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Finding Library Spaces usability test- May 2020
    (2020-05-07) Gentry, Cary; Rizki, Mandy
    This study was conducted to test the usability of the newly redesigned Library Spaces Pages, which collects spaces in Duke University Libraries. It was developed and conducted by Cary Gentry and Many Rizki, with guidance from Emily Daly and Thomas Crichlow. On February 28th we began our testing by working with a pilot participant, a student employee from the library’s service desk. On March 2nd we proceed onto the lobby for usability testing. We were located outside of the Von der Heyden Pavilion in Perkins Library we recruited 6 participants. Cary Gentry moderated all 6 participants and Many Rizki took notes for each test. Each participant was given a voucher for a free coffee or snack. For result analysis we also count our pilot test as we did not modify our script after that, resulting in a total of 7 participants.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Black Students at Duke: Qualitative Analysis of Focus Group Data - December 2019
    (2020-03) Zabala, Pamela
    The Libraries hired one of two Duke graduate students who moderated focus groups and Photovoice sessions in Fall 2019 to independently analyze findings and write a report to provide an interpretation from someone who is both unaffiliated with the Libraries and a Black student at Duke.